The filthy truth about wristbands

June 26, 2015 5:24 am 9 comments Views:
Festival filth ... Scientists found that wrist bands contain sickening amounts of bacteri

Festival filth … Scientists found that wrist bands contain sickening amounts of bacteria. Picture: Instagram: Jan.Viktor
Source: Instagram

IF you are one of those people who likes to collect festival passes like a badge of honour, you may want to think again.

A study has discovered that some wrist bands are breeding houses for bacteria, containing more than 20 times more bacteria than clothes.

Lab tests on two bands that had been on a festival goer’s wrist since 2013 showed they were home to around 9,000 micrococci and 2,000 staphylococci.

Unsuspecting victim ... Fashion blogger Marta Pozzan attends this years Cochella Music Fe

Unsuspecting victim … Fashion blogger Marta Pozzan attends this years Cochella Music Festival in the US. Picture: Getty
Source: Getty Images

“Although these bacteria are normally found on skin there was a surprisingly high number growing from the wristbands,” Microbiology professor Dr Alison Cottell of the University of Surrey told The Mirror.

“Staphylococci are usually harmless but can cause boils and also infect cuts and grazes. They can also cause acute food poisoning if they are ingested.

Festival festies ... People are being warned to ditch their old wrist bands. Picture: Get

Festival festies … People are being warned to ditch their old wrist bands. Picture: Getty
Source: Getty Images

“Infections are most likely to affect the ability of cuts and grazes to heal. More serious, but rare, complications include septicaemia.

“The hospital superbug, MRSA, is a type of staphylococcus very resistant to a number of common antibiotics.

Party time ... Festival goers enjoy the sunshine outside their tents on Day 1 of the Glas

Party time … Festival goers enjoy the sunshine outside their tents on Day 1 of the Glastonbury Festival at Worthy Farm. Picture: AP
Source: Getty Images

“It would be advisable not to wear them if working in industries such as healthcare or food preparation, where there is a risk that the bacteria may spread to other people,” she added.

Woodstock Diary: Friday
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WARNING – Graphic Content: A fly on the wall documentary on the legendary Woodstock festival.

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